Code: 53070 A

TEHRAN.(Iranart) – The Children’s Book Council of Iran and the Institute for Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults (IIDCYA) have arranged a variety of programs celebrating Children’s National Week.

Meetings and book reading sessions, local games and entertainments, as well as book introduction sessions are among the programs the council has arranged for the week that began on Saturday. 

The council has also initiated various programs to offer to those children with special needs. 

The IIDCYA has also developed a variety of programs to offer including several performances of naqqali, a dramatic style of storytelling.

Storyteller Fahimeh Barutchi performed “The Parrot and the Grocer”, a story from Persian poet Jalal ad-Din Rumi’s masterpiece Masnavi-ye Manavi on Saturday. A video of the performance is available at th.kpf.ir on the web portal of the IIDCYA.

Other performances include “Pir-e Changi” and “Noah’s Ark” by narrator Amir-Hossein Ensafi, “Healing the Blind” by Barutchi and “Tamerlane” by Mohammadreza Majuni.

The institute has also begun screening a lineup of its popular, memorable movies in an online program to celebrate the week.

The lineup includes “A Non-Profit Police Station” by Yadollah Samadi, “The Water Urn” by Ebrahim Foruzesh and “Harmonica” by Amir Naderi. 

Also included are “Knockout” by Gholamreza Ramezani, “Inspector 2” by Behruz Gharibpur and “Path of Love” by Bijan Shekarriz.

New York-based Iranian filmmaker Naderi’s “Harmonica” is set on the sun-drenched southern coast of Iran. It is about a young boy who receives a musical present from abroad. Fascinated and envious, his friends make him the leader of the pack, as they compete for the privilege of holding the harmonica or even blowing a few notes. No one is more obsessed than Amiru, gentle and heavy-set, who seems willing to do anything to get close to the harmonica and its owner.

Set in a two-room schoolhouse in mid-20th century Iran, “The Water Urn” is a heartwarming story about the daily misadventures and experiences of the village children and their beloved schoolmaster, Mr. Samadi. 

It provides an inspiring look at provincial life in a quintessential Iranian village where survival means that all members of a community must learn to work together to achieve a common goal.

“Knock Out” is about a smart student, Mohammad, who is the target of bullying by another student, Bijan. Bijan is supposed to compete with Mohammad’s friend Amir in a Taekwondo match. 

Mohammad finds out that Amir is suffering from a very serious disease, so he goes to Bijan and asks him to lose against Amir.

Source: Tehran Times

 

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